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September 24, 2016

Markham has participated in Doors Open Ontario since 2003. Our 2016 sites are clustered in the Thornhill, Unionville and Markham Village heritage conservation districts.

The City of Markham is a place where the old and the new co-exist as a unique expression of our municipality.

With our blossoming city centre taking shape only a short distance away from historical Unionville, Markham is a city of contrasts and diversity that reflects our motto: Leading While Remembering.

About the City of Markham

Markham Township was surveyed in 1793-94 in preparation for settlement. It was named for William Markham, Archbishop of York in England. Markham was first settled by German immigrants under the leadership of William Berczy, United Empire Loyalists and other Americans, and later by Pennsylvania German Mennonites and British immigrants.

Markham Township was incorporated in 1850. Within the township, villages and hamlets grew up around mill sites. Among them were Thornhill, Unionville, Markham Village and Buttonville. Today, these historical communities are heritage conservation districts containing an impressive collection of early buildings.

Markham became a town in 1971 when the Region of York was created and, in 2012, achieved city status.

For more information, visit our website.

Volunteers needed!

High school students can earn volunteer hours and have a great day being a part of Doors Open Markham. Adult volunteers needed, too!

For more information:

Contact: George Duncan
Email: gduncan@markham.ca

Parking
Full wheelchair access
Guided tours available
Ontario's medical science and innovation

Doctors of Unionville Walking Tour

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
Meet at 193 Main Street
Markham, Ontario
Saturday: one one-hour tour only at 11 a.m.
In 19th-century Ontario, every small town had a doctor that worked from home. Unionville's first doctor arrived about 1850. This walking tour showcases the doctors of Unionville and where they lived and worked, including Dr. T.P. Eckardt, a member of a prominent Berzy Settler family.
Parking
Full wheelchair access
Washrooms

Heintzman House

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
135 Bay Thorn Drive
Markham, Ontario
Telephone: 905-889-7980
Year built: 1816
Style: Regency
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The earliest part of this country mansion is an adobe brick cottage dating from the early 19th century. Colonel George Crookshank enlarged the house in 1817, and it became known as Sunnyside Manor. Charles T. Heintzman, grandson of the founder of Toronto’s Heintzman Piano Company, purchased the property in the 1930s and transformed the house into its present, elegant form.
Parking
Guided tours available

Markham Heritage Estates Walking Tour

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
Meet opposite 11 Heritage Corners Lane
Markham, Ontario
Saturday: Guided tours at 10 a.m., noon and 2 p.m. only
Markham Heritage Estates, a subdivision of relocated and restored heritage homes, has captured the imagination of would-be house restorers since its establishment in the 1980s. It's a must-see destination for anyone who dreams of rescuing a historical treasure and bringing it back to its former glory.
Parking
Full wheelchair access

Markham Village Farmers' Market

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
Robinson Street and Main Street North
Markham, Ontario
Building type: Food and drink
Saturday: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Located in the centre of old Markham Village, this farmers’ market offers local produce as well as other fresh and seasonal goods. A walk through the market will take visitors back to a time to when markets were an essential part of many Ontario villages.
Parking

McKay Art Centre

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
197 Main Street
Unionville, Ontario
Year built: c. 1850
Building type: Museum
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
This circa 1850 house is a distinctive example of Ontario vernacular architecture and features dramatic Gothic-revival and classic-revival detailing. The exterior cladding is mostly board and batten, and the rest coarse stone. Group of Seven artist Frederick Varley lived here in his later years and had a studio in the basement. See his work in the nearby Varley Art Gallery.
Parking
Full wheelchair access
Washrooms
Kid-friendly
Guided tours available
Site is protected by the Ontario Heritage Trust

Stiver Mill Community Centre

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
9 Station Lane
Unionville, Ontario
Year built: 1916
Style: Vernacular
Building type: Commercial, Food and drink
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Unionville's restored Stiver Mill is a local landmark that now serves as a community centre and farmers’ market. Originally built as a grain elevator, the western portion of the structure is one of the last of its kind in the region. A feed mill was added to the east end in the 1930s. An onsite exhibit celebrates Markham's milling industry.
Parking
Partial wheelchair access
Washrooms
Self-guided tours available

Thornhill Village Library

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
10 Colborne Street
Markham, Ontario
Year built: 1851
Landscape type: Garden
Style: Neoclassical
Building type: Library
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
The building that now houses the Thornhill Village Library was originally the home of Ellen Frizzell Ramsden, who is said to return to visit from time to time. This excellent example of classical-revival architecture and adaptive reuse was restored under the direction of B. Napier Simpson, whose architectural office was next door.
Parking
Full wheelchair access
Washrooms

Varley Art Gallery

CONTACT INFO ARCHITECTURE DATES/HOURS OPEN
216 Main Street
Unionville, Ontario
Saturday: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Situated at the top of Unionville’s historical village core, the Varley Art Gallery is an excellent example of postmodern architecture. The gallery, named after Group of Seven artist Frederick Horsman Varley, is home to a fine collection of the artist’s oils, watercolours and drawings.